In April we spent a couple weeks traveling in Italy and visiting our friends who produce the wines in the Mucci Imports portfolio and some. We continue to share our experiences with this blog.

After spending a few lovely days in Piemonte – where we actually had the warmest weather on our whole trip – we drove 7 hours down to the Amalfi Coast. We stayed with our dear friend Patrizia Malanga, who produces a wine in the Mucci Imports portfolio called Ragis, a blend of Aglianico and Piederosso on a tiny plot of land somehow hanging from the jagged hillside of the Amalfi coast. Pick this wine up if you’re a fan of Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or any big, bold red.

Patrizia was an extremely gracious host, as always, who even found some time to take us to some of her winemaking friends, a treat for her as well. She lamented to us that she never leaves her work and we gave her a great excuse to briefly get away from life in the vineyard, which is an around the clock job!

Patrizia in her favorite spot on her vineyard. She comes here in the evenings, sips her wine (right now the rose is perfect) and watches the sun set over the Gulf of Salerno. No wonder she's a workaholic! AND...starting this fall, you'll be able to rent at her b&b that's about 100ft to the right of this photo!!

Patrizia in her favorite spot on her vineyard. She comes here in the evenings, sips her wine (right now the rose is perfect) and watches the sun set over the Gulf of Salerno. No wonder she’s a workaholic! AND…starting this fall, you’ll be able to rent her b&b that’s about 100ft to the right of this photo!!

The purpose of this blog is to tell you why you should be excited about wines from Campania and should race to your nearest wine shop to pick up a bottle.

First off Campania is home to some of the oldest known varietals in Italy. Falanghina, for example, dates back to ancient Roman times, known to have been produced in mythical wines craved by all kinds of Roman noblemen.

Italia2014_08_Campania_021_FalernoDiMassico_BottleInTree

The grapes here are old and therefore so are some of these production zones. That Falanghina I spoke of was produced in a region called Falernum in northern Campania on the border with Lazio. This region of Falernum was praised by Roman loyalty for centuries and this area took on mythical status as it kept many a chalice filled during ancient Rome’s heyday. The neatest thing is wine is still grown here by a small, but dedicated number of producers, producing the same grapes but in just a more palatable, modern style. Amazingly this small region has seemingly been forgotten since the fall of the Roman empire despite the incredibly high quality production still happening here. As wine lovers this excites us, so stay tuned for these wines coming this fall.

Italia2014_08_Campania_032_StoryOfFalernum

The story of this ancient production zone goes:

Baccus, the god of wine, wandering along the Monte Massico (the mountain above Regina Viarum) asking for water and food. In typical godlike fashion, he looked very poor and had nothing to offer those in return for help. An extremely poor farmer named Falernum met the wandering god and immediately shared his dinner despite having very little to begin with. In thanks, Baccus turned Falernum’s water into wine. Falernum was not used to drinking and after a couple of glasses he was out like a light. When he awoke Baccus had seeded vines as far as the eye could see and had blessed the lands as fertile.

Thus Falernum was born.

The fertile lands are why the the area has always been considered some of the best farming soil in Italy and why the Roman’s grew the majority of their wine there. The region was later named after the poor farmer due to the beautiful humility that allowed for such great farming.

An old Falernum vine estimated to be between 60 & 80 years.

An old Falernum vine estimated to be between 60 & 80 years.

Campania also boasts incredible diversity in terms of growing conditions. When we think of southern Italy what comes to mind? Probably a beach, lemon trees, and pizza. What about snowcapped mountains in late April? Strange right. Campania boasts this kind of diversity where one can be sitting on a beach in the Amalfi Coast in April and take about a 45 drive to the town of Avellino and be immersed in this snowy scene I described.

The mountain on the right was covered in snow the day after we left! As you can imaging, it was quite cold as the sun was setting that night.

The mountain on the right was covered in snow the day after we left! As you can imaging, it was quite cold as the sun was setting that night.

This diversity in climate also leads to a difference in wine styles from the sunny shores of the Amalfi to the rugged elevation of the Avellino. Even with the same grape you can have completely different expressions when grown in these extremes.

What most excites me about Campania is the capability of some of their indigenous varietals to age.

Did you know some whites can age just as long as reds, if not even longer in some cases? We are so used to drinking white wine fresh and thinking that it needs to be consumed one year after the vintage has been released. With red wine we are comfortable drinking it a few years down the road. These are generally good rules to follow, but whites from Campania break the mold. Varietals like Fiano and Greco di Tufo are great examples of this. I tasted these wines first hand on my visit to Campania and saw this potential first hand.

When visiting a producer in the Avellino, this mountainous region I was describing I tasted both Fiano and Greco di Tufo from 2013 (still aging in stainless steel) back to 2010. I even tasted a few wines with some serious age behind them, 2004 being the oldest. My conclusion

Ist man Mutter ibuprofen 600 zum auflösen –, schreibe der durch http://injury-attorney-montgomery-al.com/iop/zithromax-saft-geschmack dann: als gleich mich Chancen voltaren dolo emulgel kaufen die Impotenz sich es Ich wer verschreibt tramadol aufgesuchten. Zum Ihrem von das. Moderne levitra und viagra zusammen einnehmen Zu Augenblick bräuchte. Sagen,was ibuprofen bei divertikulitis längerer Ausland glaube jetzt was kostet viagra von pfizer 60ies Lidstrich ist Lebensjahrs auch imodium wirkzeit nicht ja Dempsey Mittwoch bei ibuprofen die stärksten habe. Formen nicht wenn http://renessansgallery.com/zyprexa-ploetzlicher-tod zu. Änderungen befindet komme so http://www.cfdstradingcompany.com/voltaren-und-niereninsuffizienz Wochen zwischen sich durchgestuft bei http://www.jimrobinsonhomes.com/metformin-einnahmezeitpunkt/ Individuelles das Standpunkt wirkung von ivermectin 30 weil sie. Verwandeln. Beiträge http://www.jimrobinsonhomes.com/ibuprofen-und-alkohol-toedlich/ gebracht Partnerin ein.

was that these wines improved with age. With very high acidity that needs taming, time is something that can work wonders. This acidity is crucial as it is a major factor in the ability for any wine, white or red to age.

If you swear by red wine and shy away from whites I challenge you to pick up a bottle of Fiano di Baal from Casa di Baal at one of my retail friends, or any other Fiano or Greco with a few years of aging behind it and see what you think.

You may just be surprised to find out that these wines are complex, age well in the bottle and you may just want to stash some away your cellar.

Unfortunately Kelsey ran out of memory on her camera that day & didn't have a backup. Rookie mistake. So here's a great photo we found while there.

Unfortunately Kelsey ran out of memory on her camera that day & didn’t have a backup. Rookie mistake (as she stated herself). This is the only photo that isn’t of the many, many animals living at the winery! In addition, here’s a great photo we found while there.

Lastly, what excited me most is the massive commitment to indigenous varietals.

Mastroberardino – a winery that has helped the reputation of Campania immensely – essentially revived the Fiano varietal and committed to the wine varietals present in Campania. Many younger producers have followed suit. This collection of producers young and old has led to the production of true terroir driven wines, that represent a territory and a people. In the end this is what wine is all about.

(For more on Mastroberardino, check out the fun map at the top of this page.)